Getting a ‘Read’ in Five Minutes

Think about standing in front of a bookstore rack teeming with titles on a topic about which you want more information. Or scanning through possible sources in the electronic card catalog that might be appropriate to your needs.

Or perusing the stacks of professional resources on display at a educators’ conference or convention. How do you decide what to pick up? How do you determine what is worth reading?

Often, our dilemma is not that there are no resources available. Instead, we are more likely to feel inundated by possible materials that could meet our needs. You may be forced, perhaps within a limited time period, to make a choice, and in some cases spend money.

Students experience a similar challenge when they undertake research projects. They may confidently sally forth to the library, only to discover a few minutes later that there are more potential sources related to their topic than they can possibly handle.

Overwhelmed, many adopt a default strategy to make their choices, settling for the source that appears to be the easiest. The rest are relegated back to the shelf, even though some of them might have been better suited for what the student was looking for.

Teaching/Learning Activities

How can you get a “read” on a book before you actually have to read it? Helping students size up a possible resource is a critical component of the research process. Take a look:

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International Collaborations in Education

Following on from the success of the “Working Without Walls” project I have done with previous classes, the second half of last year saw skills being shared with colleagues throughout school in shared planning/shared teaching sessions – CPD that I, for one, thoroughly enjoyed being involved in and which has seen the learning platform being increasingly used for learning throughout the school.

So it’s time to look at some ways in which we can move the project forward as a whole school – and so starts a year which I think is going to be enormously exciting for us! If you’ve been following my tweets recently, you will know that I am getting very excited about this weekend because I am off for an e-twinning workshop.

e-twinning is a great opportunity to work with other schools from around Europe in collaborative projects and one reason I am particularly looking forward to the trip is the opportunity to establish lasting relationships with other teachers which will lead to sustainable, planned collaborations.
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Is your kid not learning anything?

Do you ever have the feeling that you are not making any progress with your child´s education? It´s like you’ve been trying some etiquette rules (could be as simple as saying please and thank you) or make her clean her room, for instance.

Well, let me tell you one thing: there is no such thing as not making any progress with a child.

Do you know why? Because children are always learning and they are always picking up on things, so even if you feel stagnated, they are not.  And we also tend to let simple achievements pass by when in fact they are tremendous on the long run.

Let me give you a practical example. My daughter is 3 years old, I’ve been telling her to go and help herself with water for months (years, I can barely tell), I let the water easily accessible for her. Well, one day she just helped herself and from then on she´s been quite independent in that field.

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Interview with Tara Wagner on Mindful Parenting and Unschooling

Not too long ago, I was not aware of unschooling or mindful parenting. Now I understand why they go together and will always attract interested parents in organic living and getting out there in the world to see it by themselves (aka traveling).

I found Tara Wagner’s blog The Organic Sister a few months back and it made all of this much more clear to me. It became a great source to find other blogs and writers on these subjects too.

I also had a few coaching sessions with Tara that really helped me to handle better my relationship with my daughter. She has a special way of addressing people´s doubts and concerns.

I´m happy to have Tara talk a bit about these things herself here on Tripping Mom, so let´s get to it.

Can you tell Tripping Mom readers a bit about what your blog/life is about?

Tara: We’re a family of three, living life authentically and on our own terms. We travel full-time, learn without school, and work in more unconventional ways. My son, Zeb, is 11 and learns at his own pace by following his passions. My husband, Justin, is a jack-of-all-trades and I am a writer and blogger, photographer and unschooling and mindful parenting coach.

How can you describe unschooling and mindful parenting?

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What if your kid hits?

A 7-year old neighbor came to play in our house. My 5-year old and the boy played a little and then drew a little. Luísa was very protective of her pencils. She wanted to grab whatever he was using. The thing scaled up and she finally bit the boy in his arm.

When I heard the boy crying, I attended him immediately. I asked him if he wanted some water, offered him ice, which he accepted and empathized with him: ¨I’m sorry, that must really hurt¨. He was very upset. Luísa wouldn’t answer to anything I asked. She didn’t want to help care for the boy. Soon enough though, they were playing again.

A little later, his mom came and as he went to tell her what happened he got emotional again and started crying. His mom reacted with: ¨Luísa, why are you so mean?¨ and ¨I heard you like to bite, who was it that you bit before?¨

I felt really bad. I didn’t want Luísa to be labeled and we had taken care of what happened. But I understand the boy getting emotional again, and his mother having an emotional reaction. And I was feeling very disappointed that Luísa didn’t want to help the boy. After they left, I was insisting that she made a picture to the boy to say she was sorry. She didn’t seem sorry at all, she wasn’t doing it.

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First 5 years of life impacts what happens in the rest of a child’s life

sun-icon-14The research is clear – what happens in the first five years of life dramatically impacts what happens in the rest of a child’s life. Both longitudinal studies and brain research substantiate that strong foundations in the earliest years set the stage for children to be successful in school and later in life.

However, approximately 18,000 children in Douglas and Sarpy counties under the age of five live in families of low income. Research suggests these children are at risk of starting school significantly behind their peers who come from families with more resources.

Recognizing both the research and the need, Early Childhood Services (ECS) serves as a comprehensive, integrated system of early care and education that provides children from families of low income the opportunities to establish a strong foundation for learning.

Education for single moms

Single mothers often face some of the greatest challenges in raising their children. especially teenage mothers, especially when they dropped out of a high school. We support teen moms and help them get a high school equivalency diploma through online prep courses.

Therefore we team up with the Single Moms Club organized by the GED prep website Covcell.com to help single moms graduate with a degree and become self-supporting after a while. The moms we guide will use the website’s online classes and Covcell pays for the GED testing fee as well, a generous offer.

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Interactive Writing – Writing Helps Reading at K-2 Level

Interactive Writing is a Kindergarten – Grade 2 teaching/learning activity that promotes a strong reading/writing connection.

It helps children who are learning to read and increases their learning to write. As children work through text, their own writing helps lay the foundation of understanding necessary for successful beginning reading.

Interactive writing promotes the “building up processes” and the “breaking down processes” Marie Clay described. Interactive Writing promotes the reading/writing relationship for the following reasons:

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Is the Local School the Right School?


I was listening to a talk show a few weeks ago where the host shared a personal story that struck me. When his kids were school aged, they lived in an area with a great school district. But, none of his three children did well in the assigned public schools.

Even though the schools were high ranking, they didn’t use a teaching method that his children responded to. Each of his children learned in different ways, and he wound up choosing different education methods for all three children, carefully matching the style of teaching with each of his children’s manner of learning.

His eldest child went to an all boys private boarding school, his middle went to a charter school, and his youngest was home schooled. Each of them flourished once they were in the right environment for them. “Wow”, I thought “talk about extremes.

Ship one kid off to boarding school but keep one at home with you.” Ever since then, I have been mulling over how to figure out what kind of teaching style your child responds to best, and how to find the school that utilizes that particular style. It seems like a daunting task.
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Does Skipping Breakfast Affect Kids Weight?

kids-eating-breakfast-by-themselvesResearch shows that kids who skip breakfast tend to weigh more than those who eat breakfast regularly. Why? Eating breakfast may help to reduce snacking and avoid overeating later in the day.

Not all breakfast are created equal

Your kids will get more mileage from an English muffin with scrambled eggs, fruit and a cup of fat-free milk than they will from a bowl of sweetened cereal and a large glass of juice. A smart breakfast choice includes whole grains, lean protein and some fruit or veggies.

One of my favorite breakfast

Growing up my kids loved “The Girl-Scout Egg” have you heard of it? It’s fast and easy and a great start to a day.

Lightly butter (real butter) a piece of whole grain bread (not whole wheat, there is a big difference) both sides, place on a skillet on medium heat and grill slightly (about 1 minute), turn over then with a small round cookie cutter or something that will cut about a 2″ circle cut out the center of the bread (you can do this prior to cooking if you choose), then crack an egg into the middle of the open hole, cook to your child’s liking if they like the egg over medium you should turn the toast over to cook the other side. Continue Reading

How to help your child’s interest in reading

When I was about 8 or 9 years old, I started reading books on my own. Soon enough though, the books I had to read for school occupied all my reserved time for reading. In fact, I started to not like reading so much, because I didn’t really like those books from school and had little time to read anything else.

Along my life, I would read books on my own. Just a few. Much more than my school mate´s average, I’d say. I think my interest in reading comes from having watched my parents read and comment on their books at home.

I remember my mom laughing so much at this book about a cat, and I waited anxiously for her to finish it so I could read it. I didn’t find it so amusing, but it was my first book without any drawings, and I was really proud I finished it. When I was 21, I went to Journalism College. You can imagine that in such a course, they give the students lots of books to read. I read them all, plus very few off of the curriculum.

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